From a Kerosene Lantern to Lighthouse

A wedge shaped piece of West Seattle stretches into Puget Sound forming the southern boundary of Elliott Bay, the first settlers of which were Duwamish Indians. It changed into first named New York through Charles Terry who operated a store in that region. The area changed into later named Alki Point.

In 1868 Hans Martin Hanson and his brother-in-law Knud Olson purchased the 260 acres of land from Dr. David Maynard. The purchase rate become $450. Later Hanson and Olson divided the assets with Hanson’s element being the point.

Legend has it that sometime at some stage in the 1870s farmer Hanson hung a brass kerosene lantern from a put up. He did this to be able to mark the damaging shoals of Alki Point for the mariners of Puget Sound who had been growing in numbers.

In 1887 the Federal Lighthouse Board determined that Alki Point become extraordinarily dangerous to marine visitors and that they replaced Hanson’s kerosene lantern with a “put up lantern”. “Post lanterns” were used at many locations until a lighthouse could b e built.

Because the lantern turned into on his assets, Hanson turned into appointed mild keeper. His revenue turned into $15.00 a month. For this he crammed the fuel tank, wiped clean the glass, trimmed the wicks and lit and extinguished the lamp every day. He was helped by using his son, Edmund, his six daughters, and his niece Linda Olson.

Mr. Martin’s youngsters inherited his 320-acre farm whilst he died on July 26, 1900. They also inherited the light keeper’s job which nonetheless paid best $15. A month. Edmund and his cousin Linda Olson together with Edmund’s kids stored the lamp burning for any other 10 years.

In 1910 the U. S. Lighthouse Service purchased the 1.Five acre pie-shaped piece of land at Alki Point for $9,999. A
37-foot-tall octagonal concrete and masonry tower with an attached fog sign building was constructed on the point. Behind the lighthouse become built massive homes for the lighthouse keepers and their families. In order to guard the buildings from heavy swell throughout storms and high tides the contractors delivered in approximately 7,000 yards of sand and gravel an d introduced to the factor.

This required the provider of lighthouse keepers doing 12-hour shifts seven days a week for which they were each paid $800 a year plus housing.

Over the years various improvements had been made in the lighthouse machine and modifications in employees had been made till in 1970, Albert G Anderson, the remaining civilian lighthouse keeper retired after spending twenty years at Alki Point.